Harris Academies
All Academies in our Federation aim to transform the lives of the students they serve by bringing about rapid improvement in examination results, personal development and aspiration.

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Bexley

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Haringey

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Career And Further Education

 

 

Statement of principle

The central aim of Harris Academy Morden is to provide effective education and training for all of our students. Through a well-structured and highly effective programme of CEIAG we believe that all students can develop their Courage, personal Challenge and future Success both in school and on into adult life. By working in partnership with external agencies, businesses and members of our community we will provide accurate and focussed careers information, advice and guidance tailored to the individual needs of our students, and thereby enable all of our students to make informed choices about their career pathways.

The idea of a ‘job for life’ has disappeared, with many people working in jobs that simply didn't exist only 5-10 years ago.  It is important to recognise the exciting new opportunities that are available and to gain the knowledge, skills and expertise that will enable students to work in those new areas.

Staff members responsible:

Careers Lead

Harris Federation Careers Adviser

Mr. Fraser Stewart

f.stewart@harrismorden.org.uk

0207 687 1157

Ms. Linda Jones

Linda.Jones@harrisfederation.org.uk

0207 687 1157

 

The HAMD careers entitlement

All students in years 7-11 are entitled to:

  1. Access to a planned careers programme relevant to their year group
  2. Access to a qualified, impartial and independent careers adviser for personalised guidance
  3. Access information about the world of work and labour market
  4. Access information and guidance about higher education, training and employment opportunities
  5. Develop personal and enterprise skills to improve their employability
  6. Find out about technical education qualifications and apprenticeships opportunities, as part of a careers programme, which provides information on the full range of education and training options available at each transition point.
  7. Hear from a range of local providers about the opportunities they offer, including technical education and apprenticeships – through options events, assemblies and group discussions and taster events.
  8. Be informed about how to make applications for the full range of academic and technical courses.
  9. Access to a curriculum rich in information about careers and the world of work.
  10. Access a programme of CEIAG which challenges stereotypes and discrimination, and promotes equality and diversity in training and in the workplace.

    Objectives

    Through a planned programme of CEIAG that takes a full 11-16 approach, Harris Academy Morden (HAMD) seeks to help all students to take their place as suitably qualified and responsible adults within society. HAMD endeavours to provide independent and impartial careers guidance throughout students’ time at the Academy to support career and option choice, raising the aspirations and achievement of individual students and equipping them with skills, attitudes, knowledge and understanding as a foundation for managing their lifelong career and learning.

    We aim to enable young people to learn about careers, learning and work so that they can manage their own development and make life choices and decisions that will benefit their own wellbeing and contribute to the wellbeing of others. We take a skills-centred approach to CEIAG alongside providing guidance and support.

    HAMD aims to deliver a broad, balanced and connected CEIAG curriculum that addresses young people’s entitlement and provides students with personal, social and employability skills alongside the knowledge and understanding to support:

  1. Self-development through careers and work-related education (understanding themselves and the influences on them)
  2. Learning about careers and the world of work.
  3. Career Management (developing skills for career wellbeing and employability)

Careers Map through KS3 to KS4

 

Year Group

Activities

Time of year

Gatsby Benchmark

 

Year 7

Developing Self Awareness

  • Introduction to the career service
  • AEE visits – awareness of jobs
  • Tutorial careers programme – delivered by tutors
  • STEM activities throughout the Academic year

AU1

SU2

All year

 

1 per term

1, 4, 7, 8

1, 2, 3, 5, 6

1, 2, 3, 4, 7

 

4, 5, 7

 

Year 8

Early decision making

  • Reintroduction to the Careers service
  • Career drop in sessions break time (Friday)
  • Small group careers advice Decision making (option choices) group workshops delivered in groups of four
  • AEE visits – awareness of jobs
  • Introduction to the Duke of Edinburgh program
  • STEM activities throughout the Academic year

AU1

All year

SU1-SU2

 

 

SU2

SU1

 

 

1 per term

1, 4,  7

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

1, 3, 4, 7, 8

 

 

1, 3, 5, 6

1, 2, 3, 7

 

 

4, 5, 6, 7

 

Year 9

Consolidation

  • Career drop in sessions each break time(Friday)
  • 1:1 interviews with Yr9 on the AEN register.
  •  
  • University Visits
  • Kudos and careers planning day for all year 9
  • Sports leadership
  • Duke of Edinburgh program
  • Options Assembly
  • STEM activities throughout the Academic year

All year

 

SU1-SU2

 

SU1-SU2

 

 

Periodic

SP2

 

All year

All year

SP2

1 per term

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

 

1, 3, 5, 6, 7

1, 2, 7

 

1, 7

1, 7

1, 2, 3, 7

4, 5, 6, 7

 

Year 10

Consideration

  • Career drop in sessions each break time(Friday)
  • 1:1 interviews with Yr10 on the SEND register.
  • Early intervention interviews for identified students
  • Introduction to UCAS and the good university guide (Understanding the need to bolster your CV)
  • STEM activities throughout the Academic year
  • Next steps assembly covering:
  • Detail published college and sixth form open days
  • Process of application
  • How the selection process works

All year

 

SP1-SP2

 

SP1

 

SP1-SP2

 

 

1 per term

 

SU2

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

1, 2, 3, 7

 

 

4, 5, 6, 7

 

1, 2, 3, 5, 7

 

Year 11

Achievers

  • Career drop in sessions break time(Friday)
  • Year 11 to complete their looking ahead forms prior to interviews, used to identify needs and prioritise for interviews.
  • Careers interviews 1:1 or groups of four for all students
  • Follow up interviews for support with applying for apprenticeships,those who self-refer or identified as needing additional career support e.g. SEN, EAL
  • STEM activities throughout the Academic year
  • Next steps assembly program covering:
  • Detail published college and sixth form open days
  • Process of application
  • How the selection process works
  • Tracking year 11s – preventative NEET exercise

All year

AU1-SP2

 

 

AU1-SP1

 

SP1-SP2

 

 

 

1 per term

 

2 per year

 

 

 

 

All year

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

1, 2, 3, 7

 

 

1, 2, 3, 7, 8

 

1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8

 

 

4, 5, 6, 7

 

1, 3, 5, 7

 

 

 

 

1, 3, 7

 

 

Whole Academy Initiatives

 

Year Group

Activities

Time of year

Gatsby Benchmark

 

All Year Groups

 

  • Careers and enterprise activities completed as a part of the Tutor programme
  • A range of assemblies each year devoted to Careers and enterprise
  • One competition each year devoted to Careers and enterprise

 

 

 

  • Two whole Academy Careers and Enterprise thematic days per year

 

  • Careers advisor and Careers Lead in attendance at parents evenings to liaise with students and parents

2 per term

 

 

4 per year

 

1 per Careers and Enterprise assembly

 

 2 per year

 

 

7 per year

1, 2, 3, 7

 

 

1, 5, 7

 

1

 

 

 

 

1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7

 

1, 2, 7, 8

 

 

 

#Useful Websites

The following websites can help you to look at the different careers that are available.

  1. The National Careers Service website has over 700 careers profiles providing information on the skills and qualifications required.
  2. Careers Box is a free online library of careers related films. Case studies show real people doing real jobs.
  3. Start is a free online careers platform to connect 11-18 year old with their future career potential.
  4. Prospects gives detailed job information and links to advice on writing CVs and cover letters.
  5. icould offers first-hand information about careers, including videos, as well as labour market information.
  6. LMI for All is an online data portal, which connects and standardises labour market information (LMI) with the aim of informing careers decisions.
  7. How2Become.com is one of the UK’s leading careers and educational information and development websites. From here, you can learn how to write a CV, how to complete an application form, how to pass psychometric tests and also how to perform well in a job interview.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The Gatsby Benchmarks

    Although the Gatsby Benchmarks are not a statutory framework, by adopting them, we can be confident that we are fulfilling our legal duties as well as the existing duties to secure independent careers guidance and provide opportunities to a range of providers to inform pupils about technical education qualifications or apprenticeships and the new duty to publish information about the careers programme on the school website. The Gatsby Benchmarks are;

  1. A stable careers programme

    Every school and college should have an embedded programme of career education and guidance that is known and understood by students, parents, teachers, governors and employers.

  2. Learning from career and labour market information

    Every student and their parents should have access to good quality information of an informed adviser to make the best use of available information.

  3. Addressing the needs of each student

    Students have different career guidance needs at different stages. Opportunities for advice and support need to be tailored to the needs of each student. A school’s careers programme should embed equality and diversity considerations throughout.

  4. Linking curriculum learning to careers

    All teachers should link curriculum learning with careers. STEM subject teachers should highlight the relevance of STEM subjects for a wide range of future career paths.

  5. Encounters with employers and employees

    Every student should have multiple opportunities to learn from employers about work, employment and the skills that are valued in the workplace. This can be through a range of enrichment activities including visiting speakers, mentoring and enterprise schemes.

  6. Experiences of workplaces

    Every student should have first-hand experiences of the workplace through work visits, work shadowing and/or work experience to help their exploration of career opportunities, and expand their networks.

  7. Encounters with Further and Higher Education

    All students should understand the full range of learning opportunities that are available to them. This includes both academic and vocational routes and learning in schools, colleges, universities and in the workplace.

  8. Personal Guidance

    Every student should have the opportunities for guidance interviews with a career adviser, who can be internal (a member of school staff) or external, provided they are trained to an appropriate level. These should be available whenever significant study or career choices are being made. They should be expected for all students but should be timed to meet their individual needs. (Every pupil should have at least one such interview by the age of 16, and the opportunity for a further interview by the age of 18.)